Andy Stanley & Craig Groeschel – Together – Catalyst One Day

AS: Leaning into what your strengths are means you have to give stuff away.  How has what you do or don't do changed over the years?

CG: I really believe that the more effective you want to become as a leader, the fewer things you do.  In the early years, I was the only staff member, so I did everything.  It was the greatest day when someone else cared if the toilet overflowed.

I wanted to do everything and kept my hands in it.  For example, we were the campus pastors at the pastors we preached at for too long.  People kept trying to free me up until finally I listened.

If I ask you about your church or organization and you can tell me everything, you're probably leading ineffectively.

AS: Someone asked me what my most important leadership lesson is.  Recognizing my strengths and delegating my weaknesses.  I wish I had done that earlier.  I think there was a lot of guilt there.  If I don't want to take out the trash, no one should take it out.  But when I learned to delegate what I didn't like and wasn't good at.

I used to do all of our small group training because I wanted to get it started right because it was central to what we did.  There is something to putting your time into those central place.

The hardest thing for me was giving up the senior pastor of our largest campus pastor role.

CG: It's not that we're not leading, we're leading through people, and that's even harder.

AS: Then you become the custodian of culture.  You're not doing a lot, but you pay attention to where things are going wrong.

CG: And you might sense those problems before someone else does.

AS: But I can't go in and re-own the responsibility.  I'll go to one of our churches and something will bother me.  I'll go to the senior leader and ask if something bothered him.  If it bothers him, then it doesn't have to bother me.  But if it doesn't bother him, if I think it's a four and everyone else thinks its an 8, then I have to do some retooling and some re-vision cast.

CG: How has your week changed?

AS: As your church grows and your family changes stage, you have to change your schedule.

I used to preach 2-3 times on Sunday and at 1 of our evening services.  I generally take Monday off.  I might start back in on Monday afternoon.  Tuesday is staff meetings all day.  It's almost 100% staff.  I used to have lots of lunches, I don't do that.  I exercise M, W, F.  That's important.  Our health is part of our ministry.  If you're the point leader, your physical health is part of our ministry. Wednesday is nothing but a study day.  Thursday is a study day.  Friday is the day I will schedule time I want to spend time with, elders, friends, a few people who want to meet.  Saturday, my brain is starting to lean into speaking.  We have never done anything on Saturday night for 20 years if I'm preaching on Sunday.

CG: I've been to counseling two different times for being a workaholic. I've found a managable schedule now.  It changes with the

Saturday, all day soccer games and kids stuff, 1-2 services saturday night, so I get to the church by 2:30 . Saturday is family night at the church, so my whole family comes.  The family parties on while I preach. I want them to associate being at church having a lot of fun.

I usually preach on Sundays twice, but if I like the video on Saturday night, I'll let it run on Sunday.

I have two set meetings on Mondays.  I do all of the paperwork and everything with my assistant on Monday, and then I shift into sermon prep on Monday afternoon.

Tuesday is full on message prep all day.

By Wednesday I'm finishing up the message and I go into do our videos, and every week I go in and do a bunch of videos for campuses, churches, etc.

Every day I try to leave by 3:45 to go to the gym.  Ministry is never, ever done, so if I put an artificial barrier on my day, it forces me to be efficient.  I believe I get more done.  I'm home by 5:15 every night.

Thursday is the day I meet with whomever I want to.

Friday is usually my day off.

We meet Monday mornings with our key leaders, and we meet with our board or key leaders as needed throughout the year.

That's the template, so people ask, "When are you a pastor?" This guy ended his life, and I called his wife.  There was a guy struggling with his marriage.

You can't get too big to just pastor people.

AS: I primarily pastor my staff.  We probably feel the weight to pastor a similar amount of people as a single site, single congregation pastor.  It's just that we have larger staff.

CG: I was raised that the church come first, but I've found that I have to keep myself spiritually healthy and my marriage healthy.

AS: I used to ask Sandra every now and again, just, "How am I doing?"

CG: I ask Amy all of the time, "What are the three things I do that are the biggest blessing to you?  What are the three things I do that could use work?"

 

Posted at 4:10 PM on November 15th, 2012
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Craig Groeschel is the founding and senior pastor of LifeChurch.tv, a multi-site church based out of Oklahoma and stretching across...

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